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Full text of "Pilgrim"

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THE 



PILGRIM 

PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 







Oedicatea. 1 o 



ANDREE STRAKER 





"Our share of night to bear, 
Our share of morning, — " 

Emily Dickinson 




MANNERS 

AND 

DEMOCRACY 

by 
EDGAR J. MONGAN 

Over one hundred years be- 
fore Columbus set sail on his 
voyage of discovery William 
of Wykeham in England wrote, 
"Manners Makyth Man," and 
thought so well of it that he 
gave it as a motto to his 
great foundations — New College 
at Oxford, and the famous pub- 
lic school at Winchester, In our 
day we may raise an eyebrow 
at William's naivete, his sim- 
plicity, for his motto in these 
times seems an exaggeration if 
not an absurdity. 

Yet sound second thought must make us pause before we dismiss 
these words, for, after all, the works of this great man are still nourishing 
after 600 years. Such vitality comes from sound common sense, and that 
is a commodity we can use today, as we can use manners. 

We make no parade of manners in our day-to-day living, follow no 
elaborate ritual of conduct. But we have learned that a decent regard for 
another man's rights and feelings and a proper respect for our own honor 
and dignity is fundamental to a democratic society. And, in essence, these 
concepts are the basis of manners also. Our courts and our legislatures 
(even when they offend) function because of these considerations. The 
free interchange of opinion, so necessary to a democracy, must at bottom 
rest on what we commonly call manners, else discussion becomes no more 
than disagreement and may easily degenerate into mob rule. And that is 
one of the deadliest forms of tyranny. 

The antics of the Russians in the United Nations assembly and else- 
where in the world where their representatives meet those of the western 
nations, provide a case in point. Their utter disregard for the rights and 
feelings of others, the wild charges, the baseless accusations, the intemper- 
ate language, the evident bad faith, all shock us deeply. Our sense of fair 
play is outraged, our feeling for decent human conduct is offended, not 
only because "the truth is not in them" but because they make such a 
show of themselves as -well. 

Everyone knows that manners can be vitiated by hypocrisy, and the 
fawning, oily, "smooth operator" is the object of our distrust as well as 
our contempt. But the sincere and honest man, considerate of others, no 
matter how humble or exalted his station, always has the regard of his 
fellow men, and usually their liking as well. 

William of Wykeham worded his motto as he did because he knew 
that we have to live in the world with all sorts of people, and our place in 
the world depends upon their estimate of us — and that, to a large degree, 
depends upon our manners. 



1950 - Pilgrim Staff - 1951 

Editor-in-Chief Jane Hilton 

Assistant Editors Marilyn Griffith 

Bradford Barnes 

Business Manager David Pyle 

Staff Ann Hilton, Dexter Olsson, Marguerite 

Holmes, Peter Damon, Sally Mandel, 
Sally Holmes, Nancy St. George 

Art Editor Warren Burgess 

Staff Sylvia Melahoures 

Richard Blaisdel 
Warren Bates 

Candid Camera Editor Joan Borgatti 

Staff Richard Martinelli 

Franklin Bassett 
Donald Avery 

School News Editor Jeanette Doten 

Staff Dimitra Colas 

Joyce Contente 

Boys' Sports Editor Raynor Taylor 

Staff Donald Jesse 

Philip Carletti 

Girls' Sports Editor Rosanne Rossetti 

Nancy Prindle 

Senior Features Editor Suzanne Sharkey 

Staff Becky Small, Kathryn Gordon, 

Brian Finnegan, Anna Stefani 

Senior Statistics Editor Joan Neri 

Staff Yvonne Corvelo, Alvin Wood, 

David Priestley 

French Editor Priscilla Johnson 

Assistant Janice Williams 

Latin Editor Carol White 

Assistant Adele Vandini 

Science — Math Editor Alan Strassel 

Assistant John Tillson 

Typists Joan Neri, Anna Stefani, 

Ann Dempsey, Corinne Pierce, 
Becky Small 

Distribution Neilia Halunen 

Patricia Parkhurst 



The staff extends its sincere thanks to The Dickson's 
Photographic Studio for their invaluable aid in the pro- 
duction of this yearbook. 




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Senior Profiles 




RICHARD TAV ARES— President 

The class of 1951 has certainly chosen a winner as class leader 
this year. Amiable and good looking, Dick is not only our Class 
President but also the co-captain of the football team. For two 
years he has been a member of the Student Activities Society, and 
a collector for the Children's Medical Center and Jimmy Fund. As 
a member of the football, baseball, intramural basketball and vol- 
ley ball teams, Dick has distinguished himself, and he is an ever- 
willing worker for various dance committees. We are proud to 
have such a capable and enthusiastic leader in our midst. 



LOUIS MENGOLI— Vice President 

When we asked Louie to list his activities during the last three 
years, he blithely told us, "Trouble". One of Louie's chief assets, 
we find, is his sense of humor, plus his excellent and, may we add, 
endless collection of jokes. Louie has distinguished himself with 
his class both by his outstanding ability on the basketball team and 
his service as vice president of the class during both his sophomore 
and senior years. He has been a collector for the ten-cent-a-week 
plan for two years and a willing participant in the work of various 
dance committees. We will always remember him as the originator 
of our famous "kickapoo joy juice". 





KATHRYN GORDON— Secretary 

Pert and pretty "Kathy" would make the ideal businessman's 
secretary; but since she prefers the nursing profession, we know 
she'll be capable of reviving the sickest from their death beds. Our 
class secretary for four years, a members of the S.A.S., Library 
and Pilgrim staffs, collector for our various school projects for the 
past three years, and for two years an office assistant and member 
of the Honor Society and Honor Group, "Kathy" is certainly one of 
the most esteemed members of her class. 



DAVID PRIESTLEY— Treasurer 

For the past four years our class has voted David Priestley as 
class treasurer. Who else could we find as capable of rescuing us 
from our numerous financial difficulties? Dave, with his keen sense 
of humor and wit, was a member of the Student Activities Society 
and the camera club during his sophomore year, radio club in his 
senior year, and numerous dance committees. He is also the man- 
ager of our basketball team and a member of the PILGRIM staff. 
We would have to travel far to find another as clever and as 
capable. 





CHARLES ABBOTT 

Nickname — "Chuck" 
Virtue — Good Driver 
Vice — Canal Fishers 
Quotation — "He is taller than 
any of his court" 





ROY ALSHEIMER 

Nickname — "Ollie" 
Virtue — Willing worker 
Vice — Cars with speedometers 
Quotation — "Speed is our safety 
over thin ice" 



NAN APPLING 

Nickname — "Honey" 
Virtue — Friendliness 
Vice — Oh so small 
Quotation — "Size is not 
grandeur" 





DONALD AVERY 

Nickname — "Avery" 
Virtue — Good natured 
Vice— Food 

Quotation — "To eat, to drink, 
and to be merry" 



CHESTER BAGNI 

Nickname — "Cheese" 
Virtue — Dependability 
Vice — Wise cracks 
Quotation — "To live, and act, 
and serve the future hour" 




JOHN BARRETT 

Nickname — "Jack" 
Virtue — Easy to get along with 
Vice — One track mind 
Quotation — "I've taken my fun 
where I've found it" 




FRANKLIN BASSETT 

Nickname — "Frank" 
Virtue — Republican 
Vice — Temper 

Quotation — "There's a Ford in 
your future" 




GERALD1NE BASTONI 

Nickname — "Girly" 

Virtue — Good dancer 

Vice — Need for more study 

periods 
Quotation — " — she dances such 

a way! 

No sun upon an Easter-day 
Is half so fine a sight." 




WARREN BATES 

Nickname — "Buddy" 
Virtue — Everyone's friend 
Vice — Night owl 
Quotation — "A good friend 
long remembered" 




FLORENCE BEAN 

Nickname — "Beanie" 
Virtue — Intense interest in 

psychology 
Vice — Can't stay awake 
Quotation — "Where none will 

sweat but for promotion" 




NATALIE BENT 

Nickname — "Chicken" 
Virtue — Exotic voice 
Vice — Forgetfulnesa 
Quotation — "Patience is 
virtue" 




NORMAN BOLDUC 

Nickname — "Duck" 
Virtue — Silence 
Vice — "de goils" 

Quotation — "The quiet mind is 
richer than a crown" 




JOAN BORGATTI 

Nickname — "Jo" 
Virtue — Dependability 
Vice — Rationed smiles 
Quotation — "The virtue lies in 
the struggle not the prize" 




BEVERLY BOUTIN 

Nickname — "Snookie" 
Virtue — Cheerfulness 
Vice — Males 

Quotation — "With a smile on 
her lips" 




ANNE BRATTI 

Nickname — "Kitty" 
Virtue — Roller-skating 
Vice — Homework 
Quotation — "With grace and 
rythm" 




HELEN BURGESS 

Nickname — "Sport" 
Virtue — Her way with horses 
Vice — Always tired 
Quotation — "A horse! a horse! 
my kingdom for a horse" 




KENNETH BURGESS 

Nickname — "Burge" 

Virtue — Good natured 

Vice — Arguing about automo- 
biles 

Quotation — "We first survey the 
the plot, then draw the 
model" 




ANN CAPOZUCCA 

Nickname — "Cappy" 

Virtue — Innocent expression 

Vice — Basic Mechanics home- 
lesson 

Quotation — "I have fought a 
good fight" 




MARIE CARR 

Nickname — 

Virtue — Ability to look up to 
people 

Vice — Forgetfulness 
Quotation — "Small but how 
dear to us" 







DIMITRA COLAS 

Nickname — "Meme" 
Virtue — Patience 
Vice — Last minute girl 
Quotation — "Whose little body 
lodg'd a mighty mind" 




JOHN CHANDLER 

Nickname — "Happy" 

Virtue — "Brilliant, scintillating 

personality" — A. Urann 
Vice — Women in general 
Quotation — "The silliest woman 

can manage a clever man; but 

it needs a very clever woman 

to manage a fool" 




YVONNE CORVELO 

Nickname — 
Virtue — Gay, cheerful 
Vice — Level head 
Quotation — "The soul of music 
slumbers in the shell" 




EDWARD CLOSUIT 

Nickname — "Crowbait" 

Virtue — Connie 

Vice — A. Urann 

Quotation — "Study to be quiet" 




EDWARD COSTA 

Nickname — "Ed" 
Virtue — Red Sox Fan 
Vice — Argumentative nature 
Quotation — "No one ever died 
of laughter" 




JANET COSTA 

Nickname — "Jan" 
Virtue — Friendliness 
Vice— Giggling 

Quotation — "But to be young 
was very heaven" 




JOAN CRAVALHO 

Nickame — "Joanie" 

Virtue — Friends with everyone 

Vice — Too quiet 

Quotation — "And all that's best 

of dark and bright 

Meet in her aspect and her 

eyes" 




MANSEL CROWELL 

Nickname — "Slimey-Limey" 

Virtue — Good natured 

Vice — Likes to be alone 

Quotation — "I love tranquil so- 
licitude 

And such society 
As is quiet, wise, and good" 






LOUISE DAVID 

Nickname — 
Virtue — Sewing 
Vice — Slow eater 
Quotation — "Sober, steadfast, 
and demure" 



JOHN DAVIDSON 

Nickname — "Jack" 

Virtue — Quietness 

Vice — Mrs. Urann, Charlie's car 

Quotation — "Silence is deep as 

eternity: speech is shallow as 

time" 



FRANCES DAVIS 

Nickname — "Frannie" 
Virtue — Such art 
Vice — Make-up cards 
Quotation — "As the sun colors 
flowers, so does art color life" 



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ANN DEMPSEY 

Nickname — "Demps" 

Virtue — Friendliness 

Vice — Temper 

Quotation — "She, like all good 

women, had a temper of her 

own" 



RONALD DiSALVATORE 

Nickname — "Dagoe" 

Virtue — a cheerleader 

Vice — Smoking 

Quotation — "He speakth not and 

yet there lies a conversation 

in his eyes" 



JEANETTE DOTEN 

Nickname — "Nett" 

Virtue — a new day a new friend 

Vice — Temper! Temper! 

Quotation — " — the most essen- 
tial thing for happiness is the 
gift of friendship" 





NANCY DOUYLLIEZ 

Nickname — "Nan" 
Virtue — Though tfulness 
Vice — Daydream ing 
Quotation — "Let us all to 
dream" 



JANET EDDY 

Nickname — "Jan" 

Virtue — Self-assurance 

Vice — One word vocabulary — 
"Buddy" 

Quotation — "She moves a god- 
dess, and she looks a queen" 




DOROTHY ELLIS 

Nickname — "Dot" 

Virtue — Winning ways 

Vice— Food 

Quotation — "She takes the 

breath of men way 

who gaze upon her unaware" 




ARNE ERICKSON 

Nickname — "Arn" 
Virtue — Strong Democrat 
Vice — Inhabitant of Carver 

Quotation — "I've heard of his 
country" 




ELEANOR FAVA 

Nickname — "Ellie" 
Virtue — Good natured 
Vice — Homelessons 
Quotation — "Her disposition 
as sunny as her hair" 




RAMIRO FERREIRA 

Nickname — "Tete" 

Virtue — "An avid member of 

the eminent Portuguese race" 
Vice — Women hater 
Quotation — "But as you know 

me all, a plain blunt man" 




BRIAN FINNEGAN 

Nickname — "Fin" 

Virtue — Self-control 

Vice — Association with L. Mar- 

tinelli 
Quotation — "On with the dance" 




JOSEPH FONSECA 

Nickname — "Joe" 
Virtue — Exactness 
Vice — Psychology 

Quotation — "He knew the pre- 
cise psychological moment 
when to say nothing" 




ARTHUR FONTES 

Nickname — "Art" 

Virtue — Friendliness 

Vice — He doesn't need any 

breath 
Quotation — "A gentleman who 

loves to hear himself talk" 




JOSEPH FREITAS 

Nickname — "Butch" 
Virtue — His way with the girls 
Vice — doesn't carry bobby-pins 
Quotation — "The sporting man's 
sense of luck and chance" 




NAOMI FURTADO 

Nickname — "Vi" 

Virtue — Personality 

Vice — Easy Going 

Quotation — "A winning smile, 

Eyes that are dancing all 

the while" 




FAITH GARNETT 

Nickname — "Fushie" 

Virtue — Good worker 

Vice — Silence 

Quotation — "Through her ex- 
pressive eyes her soul dfs- 
tinctly spoke" 








i 



JOHN GOMEZ 

Nickname — "Jake" 
Virtue — Easy going 
Vice — Talks too fast 



Quotation — "He 
out friends" 



is never with- 



KATHRYN GORDON 

Nickname — "Kathy" 
Virtue — Her smile 
Vice — Too inquisitive 
Quotation — "Whose smile no 
other maids' surpass" 



RALPH GRAFFAM 

Nickname — 

Virtue — Determination 

Vice — "Lem Diaz" 

Quotation — "To rest is not to 
conquer" 





ALTON GUARALDI 

Nickname — "Al" 
Virtue — Boats 
Vice — Shyness 

Quotation — "And he whose eyes 
are never still" 



JEANETTE GUARALDI 

Nickname — "Jean" 
Virtue — Willingness 
Vice — Driving 

Quotation — "All is not done 
until it is finished" 




NEILIA HALUNEN 

Nickname — "Nee-Nee" 
Virtue — Her speaking voice 
Vice — Inconsiderate 
Quotation — "Thou speakest 
wiser than thou art aware of 





PETER HARVENDER 

Nickname — "Pete" 
Virtue — Friendliness 
Vice — Girls 

Quotation — "Without music life 
would be a mistake" 



SHIRLEY HENRY 

Nickname — "Shirl" 
Virtue — Dimple 
Vice — Banana-splits 
Quotation — "Ho, pretty girl 
with the dimpled chin" 




JANE HILTON 

Nickname — "Hilt" 
Virtue — Personality plus 
Vice — Absentmindedness 
Quotation — "On her and her 

high endeavor 

The light of praise shall shine 

forever" 




DONALD JESSE 

Nickname — "Ace" 

Virtue — His way with teachers 

Vice — Cooking 

Quotation — "The cook was a 

good cook, as cooks go; and 

as cooks go he went" 




PRISCILLA JOHNSON 

Nickname — "Cyd" 

Virtue — Accomplishment 

Vice — Too quiet 

Quotation — "She that was ever 
fair and never proud 
Had tongue at will and yet 
was never loud" 




RONALD JULIAN! 

Nickname — "Chippy" 
Virtue — Comedian 
Vice — What is a vice? 
Quotation — "What fun! what 
fun!" 




RICHARD KIERSTEAD 

Nickname — "Dick" 
Virtue — Girls 
Vice — A certain someone 
Quotation — " Tis good to live 
and learn" 




CONSTANCE KINGMAN 

Nickname — "Connie" 
Virtue — Good dancer 
Vice — Last minute studying 
Quotation — "Ah, the art of 
dancing" 




LORRAINE LEWIS 

Nickname — "Lorrie" 

Virtue — Neatness 

Vice— U. E.'s 

Quotation — "Busy as a bee" 




JANE LOWE 

Nickname — "Janie" 
Virtue — Quick mind 
Vice — Temper 

Quotation — "The worst is still 
behind" 




BEVERLY MADERIOS 

Nickname — "Blackie" 
Virtue — Domesticity 
Vice — Cats 
Quotation — "Determination" 




LEWIS MARTINELLI 

Nickname — "Skippy" 
Virtue — Sense of humor 
Vice — jokes 

Quotation — "By a small sample 
we judge of the whole piece" 




RICHARD MARTINELLI 

Nickname — "Dick*' 
Virtue — Neatness 
Vice — Unrestrained laughter 
Quotation — "Let every man 
look before he leaps" 




LOUIS MENGOLI 

Nickname — "Louie" 
Virtue — Too numerous to 

mention 

Vice — President 
Quotation — To the teachers — 

" 'Tis my presence that doth 
trouble ye" 




ANN MONTANARI 

Nickname — 

Virtue — Her hair 

Vice — Bookkeeping Cycle 

Quotation — "A woman she 
seems of cheerful yesterdays 
and confident to-morrows" 




ALVIN MOREY 

Nickname — "Al" 
Virtue — Persi stence 
Vice — Wrestling 

Quotation — "Fight and conquer 
again and again" 




ALTON MORISI 

Nickname — "Al" 

Virtue — Contagious laugh 

Vice — Girls, parties, and 

Mengoli 
Quotation — "Laugh yourself into 

stitches" 




BEVERLY NELSON 

Nickname — "Billie" 
Virtue — No names mentioned 
Vice — Jane 

Quotation — "Cookery is an art 
and a noble science" 




JOAN NERI 

Nickname — "Joanie" 

Virtue — What has Grable got 
that she hasn't? 

Vice — Boys with Fords 

Quotation — "Nothing is impos- 
sible to a willing heart" 





CHARLES NORTHRUP 

Nickname — "Charlie" 
Virtue— Red Sox Fan 
Vice — Too quiet 
Quotation — "A still and quiet 
conscience" 



GORDON NYE 

Nickname — "Gordie" 
Virtue — Friendliness 
Vice — A girl named Joan 
Quotation — "There is a history 
in all men's lives" 




PETER O'BRIEN 

Nickname — "O'B" 

Virtue — No bounds 

Vice — Jeanette, George, and 

Roy 
Quotation — "Laugh and the 

world laughs with you" 




WAYNE OWENS 

Nickname — "Wayne-Zee- 
Wee-Wee 
Virtue — Great historian 
Vice — Legs 

Quotation — "He greets you with 
a smile" 




CORINNE PIERCE 

Nickname — 
Virtue— Al 

Vice — Fantastic stories 
Quotation — "She's lovely, she's 
engaged, she uses Ponds" 




HELEN PILLSBURY 

Nickname — "Pill" 
Virtue — Frankness 
Vice — Temper 

Quotation — "Speak now or for- 
ever hold your peace" 





ROBERT PIMENTAL 

Nickname — "Rat" 
Virtue — His way with women 
Vice — Girls 

Quotation — "He speaks as he 
thinks" 



JOHN PINTO 

Nickname — "John Wilbur" 
Virtue — Versatility 
Vice — Fishing 

Quotation — "Nothing is impos- 
sible" 




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DAVID PRIESTLEY 

Nickname — "Dave Wilbur" 
Virtue— Pill-Hill inhabitant 
Vice — Clamp for Wood 
Quotation — "Remember that 
time is money" 




MARLENE PROCTOR 

Nickname — "Blondie" 
Virtue — Personality 
Vice — Blushing 

Quotation — "A slight color tints 
her cheek" 




DAVID PYLE 

Nickname — "Pithergile" 
Virtue — Dish-water blondes 
Vice — Sleepy 

Quotation — " — onward, upward, 
'till the goal ye win" 






V 



ROBERT RICHMOND 

Nickname — "Bob" 

Virtue — Household arts 

Vice — English 

Quotation — "Then he will talk 

— good God! how he will 

talk" 




JOAN ROBBINS 

Nickname — "Red" 
Virtue — Pretty hair 
Vice — Ice Cream 
Quotation — <" — whose hair will 
light the dark day" 






BERTRAM ROGERS 

Nickname — "King" 
Virtue — Household arts 
Vice — World History 
Quotation — "He who cooks well 
deserves praise" 




ROSANNE ROSSETTI 

Nickname — "Snookie" 
Virtue — Good natured 
Vice — Last minute rush 
Quotation — "Her sparkling eye 

and brilliant smile are shared 

with everyone" 







JANICE ROY 

Nickname — "Jan" 

Virtue — Artistic nature 

Vice — Margie 

Quotation — "So vast is art" 




WILLIAM ST. GEORGE 

Nickname — "Saint" 
Virtue — Escape from Plymouth 
Vice — Radio 

Quotation — "I cannot sleep a 
wink" 




CHARLES SANDERSON 

Nickname — "Sandy" 

Virtue — 5th period study 

Vice — English 

Quotation — "He worries not: he 




hurries not: his calm 
disturbed" 



is un- 



HENRY SAVI 

Nickname — "Doc" 
Virtue — Trip to Whitman 
Vice — Jane 

Quotation —"And to be sincere 
is wonderful" 




BRUCE SCAGLIARINI 

Nickname — "Scag Wilbur" 
Virtue — Behavior in Latin? 
Vice — Bowling 

Quotation — "I caught the big- 
gest fish!" 






SUZANNE SHARKEY 

Nickname — "Suzy" 
Virtue — Genuine sincerity 
Vice — Her laughing over some- 
thing no one knows anything 
about. 
Quotation — "Her smile, her 
manner, her wit are priceless" 



REBECCA SMALL 

Nickname — "Becky" 
Virtue — Fun to be with 
Vice — Telephoneitis 
Quotation — "Small service is 
true service" 



JACQUELYN SMITH 

Nickname — "Jackie" 
Virtue — Hard worker 
Vice — Dramatics 

Quotation — "All her words and 
actions" 



mmmmmmamu 






LAURA SPENCER 

Nickname — 
Virtue — Eyes 
Vice — Oh! so quiet 
Quotation — "Enter to help the 
sick" 



ANNA STEFANI 

Nickname — "Roody" 
Virtue — Smile — when she does 
Vice — Oh! That certain someone 
Quotation — "Her smile was the 
sweetest that ever was seen" 



PAULINE STORY 

Nickname — "Polly" 

Virtue — Smile 

Vice — Doubtfulness 

Quotation — "A secret's safe be- 
tween you and me and the 
gate-post" 






ALLEN STRASSEL 

Nickname — "Strass" 
Virtue — Johnny on the spot 
Vice — Arguing 
Quotation — "Hunting, the 

amusement of the English 

gentlemen" 



JANICE STRASSEL 

Nickname — "Jan" 

Virtue — Good sport 

Vice — Warren, Warren, Warren 

Quotation — "Like the careless 

flowing fountains were the 

ripples of her hair" 



MARGARET SYLVIA 

Nickname — "Margie" 
Virtue — Friendliness 
Vice — Jan 

Quotation — "A friend in need is 
a friend indeed" 






RICHARD TAVARES 

Nickname — "Beans" 
Virtue — My Toni! 
Vice — Girls and their parties 
Quotation — "Love is different 
with us men" 



RAYNOR TAYLOR 

Nickname — "Ray" 
Virtue — Scholarly 
Vice — J. Tillson 

Quotation — "Musick is the thing 
of the world that I love most" 



JANE THOMAS 

Nickname — "Janie" 
Virtue — Dancing eyes 
Vice — Her set mind 
Quotation — "A strong mind 
leadth her ways" 






MARJORIE THOMAS 

Nickname — "Margie" 
Virtue — Congenial manner 
Vice — Slang expressions 
Quotation — "The perfect scholar 
is she" 



JOHN TILLSON 

Nickname — "Skin head" 
Virtue — Another women hater 
Vice — Taylor and Pinto 
Quotation — "It is wise to be 
cautious but it can be over- 
done" 



ROBERT TRAVERSO 

Nickname — "Tippy" 
Virtue — Co-operative 
Vice — Baseball 
Quotation — "Actions speak 
louder than words" 




CAROL TUPPER 

Nickname — "Tuppy" 

Virtue — We know 

Vice — Quiet 

Quotation — "Though silence 

reigns all is not always 

peaceful" 





JOHN VAZ 

Nickname — "Java" 
Virtue — Quarterbacking 
Vice — School 

Quotation — " — A Faithful friend 
is best" 



JANICE WEEDEN 

Nickname — "Jan" 
Virtue — Sense of humor 
Vice— Talk— talk— talk 
Quotation — "Such sparkling 
eyes and rosey cheeks" 




BEVERLY WESTON 

Nickname — "Bev" 

Virtue — Willingness to help 

Vice — Pcems 

Quotation — "Neat as a pin" 





JACQUELYN WESTON 

Nickname — "Jackie" 

Virtue — She can always see in 

a crowd 
Vice — Short boys 
Quotation — "She walks with 

grace and beauty" 



CAROL WHITE 

Nickname — 

Virtue — Efficiency 

Vice — Boys that eat onions 

Quotation — '"'Efficiency is skill" 




IRA WHITE 

Nickname — "Bob" 

Virtue — Studious? 

Vice — Baseball 

Quotation — "Silence is golden" 





EDGAR WILLIAMSON 

Nickname — "Wimpy" 

Virtue — Can't keep track of 

them 
Vice — School, school, school 
Quotation — "The proof is in the 

pudding" 



NANCY WILLIS 

Nickname — "Nanc" 
Virtue— Better half 
Vice — Flirting 

Quotation — "Vim. vigor, and 
vitality" 




4>; 

ALVIN WOOD 

Nickname — "Woody" 
Virtue — Conduct 
Vice — Girls 

Quotation — "The spirit is indeed 
willing" 




JOHN WOOD 

Nickname — "Jackie" 
Virtue — He is an angel 
Vice— Basketball 
Quotation — "He is a friend 
among friends" 




DORIS YOUNGMAN 

Nickname — "Rusty" 
Virtue— Her smile 
Vice — Words, and more words 
Quotation — "Let us be true to 
one another" 



"After Graduation — What?" 

As the class of 1951 comes to the conclusion of its high school career 
and graduation draws near, we, as do all high school seniors, begin to 
wonder, and to worry, and to plan more seriously than ever before. Many 
of us will attend college; others will enlist or be drafted into the service; 
and still others will be faced with the age old problem of where and how 
to find a job — not just A job, but the right job. No examination question 
can be tougher than the one you ask yourself, "After graduation — what?" 

Our senior year is a climax and also a turning point, and we should 
have turned it into a testing ground for the new work attitudes and tech- 
niques we will need months hence in college or on the job. If we want to 
avoid painful adjustments, then we should have really worked hard at 
being a senior. We aren't talking about needing the grades for college 
entrance or a good job recommendation. We are talking about the sense 
of personal responsibilities we'll need after graduation. 

In high school we are constrained. Home-work is assigned to us, we 
are given exact deadlines for compositions and speeches and our teachers 
remind us of them a few days before; and though we may think longingly 
of greater freedom, strict standards keep us busy. When we are out of 
high school we won't be operating within any such framework. Success 
must come through our own efforts. Discipline is still necessary, but it 
must be self-discipline. Personal development and growth bring recog- 
nition, and being prepared insures success. 

To a great degree we are architects and builders of our own fortunes, 
and architects and builders make plans and specifications before they 
begin work. After the foundation is laid the superstructure is built upon 
it and it cannot be otherwise in the building of character and success. 

We remember our heritage as Americans, New Englanders and Ply- 
mouthians; we appreciate the advantages provided by our public school 
system and will go forward, making the most of our opportunities and 
responsibilities in the building of a new heritage for future citizens of 
the World. 

Jane Hilton, 

Editor 






mSs. 



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V 

FACULTY 

Seated: Mrs. Miriam Raymond, Mrs Virginia Kingman, Mrs. Margaret Brown, Miss 
Jeanette Jacques, Miss Iris Albertini, Mrs. Lydia Gardner, Miss Nellie Locklin, Mrs. 
Helen Bagnall, Miss Elizabeth Kelly, Miss Ellen Downey, Miss Helen Johnson. 

Standing: Mr. Claiborne Young, Mr. Joffrey Nunez, Mr. Carlo Guidaboni, Mr. Edgar 
Mongan, Mr. Roland Holmes, Mr. John Packard, Mr. Mario Romano. 

Missing: Mr. John Pacheco, Miss Ardys Farnsworth, Miss Marietta Canan, Mrs. Alice 
Urann, Mr. Arthur Pyle, Miss Margie Wilber, Mr. Richard Smiley, Mrs. Ruth Bailey. 

The Faculty 

Mr. Roland Holmes: "Beware the fury of a patient man" 

Mrs. Virginia Kingman: .... "A finger in every pie" 

Mrs. Margaret Brown: "All colors agree in the dark" 

Mr. John Pacheco: "Rugged the beast that music cannot tame" 

Miss Ardys Farnsworth: .... "The game's up!" 

Miss Marietta Canan: "The nightingale got no prize at the poultry show" 

Mrs. Miriam Raymond "I have no superfluous leisure" 

Mrs. Alice Urann: "We have some salt of our youth in us" 

Mrs. Helen Bagnall: "And heaven's soft azure in her eye was seen" 

Mr. Arthur Pyle: "Slow and steady wins the race" 

Mrs. Lydia Gardner: "There's a time for all things" 

Miss Ellen Downey: "Arguments hot to the close" 

Miss Elizabeth Kelly: "Mirth makes the banquet sweet" 

Mr. John Packard: "I wish I could explain the explanations" 




THE FACULTY - continued 

Mr. Carlo Guidaboni: "What trouble waits upon a casual frown" 

Miss Margie Wilber: "Hold their noses to the grindstone" 

Miss Iris Albertini: "All hope abandon, ye who enter here" 

Miss Jeanette Jacques "Paris is the middle-aged woman's paradise" 

Mr. Richard Smiley: "You tread upon rny patience" 

Mrs. Ruth Bailey: "You will be five minutes too late all your lifetime" 

Mr. Mario Romano: "The monuments of wit survive the monuments of power" 

Miss Helen Johnson: "Labor is but refreshment from repose" 

Mr. Claiborne Young: "Tush! Tush! fear boys with bugs" 

Miss Nellie Locklin: "I shall laugh myself to death" 

Mr. Joffrey Nunez: "He is not merely a chip off the old block, but the old block itself" 

Mr. Edgar Mongan: 'The music in my heart I bore, long after it was heard no more" 




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Class Favorites 

SUBJECT: Household Arts 

RENDEZVOUS: Skippy's 

PROGRAM: W. H. D. H. 

ORCHESTRA: Ralph Flannigan 

FOOD: Pizza 

ACTRESS: June Allyson 

ACTOR: John Wayne 

ACTIVITY: Dancing 

PASTIME: Sleeping 

SPORT: Basketball 

SONG: Tennessee Waltz 




21 Z 







XV 



^^ C No5t Witty %sj* 





°*<//, 



«/• 



CLASS 



TOPS 





MosT Bashful 





&p 



\&? Best Att-rovnd tyo$^^^ 




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CLASS 







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ty 




'TOPS "^ 



J i I so»»w.V 




MoStTa/Kative 




Class Tops 



Most Industrious: Joan Borgatti David Pyle 



Bobby Richmond 
Dick Tavares 
Ronnie DiSalvatore 
Joe Freitas 
Chippy Juliani 
Bobby Traverso 



Most Talkative: Rosanne Rossetti 

Most Popular: Jane Hilton 

Most Bashful: Louise David 

Most Athletic: Ann Dempsey 

Most Friendly: Jeanette Doten 

Most Dramatic: Helen Burgess 

Most Likely to Succeed: .... Priscilla Johnson Alton Morisi 

Most Argumentative: Ann Capozucca Eddie Costa 

Most Witty: Janet Eddy Arthur Fontes 

Most Intellectual: Janice Roy Ray Taylor 

Best Natured: Becky Small Charlie Abbott 

Best Dressed: Dotty Ellis Chet Bagni 

Best All-Round: Suzy Sharkey Louie Mengoli 

Best Dancer: Nancy Willis Brian Finnegan 

Best Looking: Joan Neri Roy Alsheimer 




The Seniors Speak 

Literature 



THE SCHOONER 

Look at the dip and roll and beauty of her, 

Feel the salty spray 
As she plows through the sparkling water of 

The dark and white-capped bay. 

Look at her solid, sturdy masts, 

Reaching for the sky; 
Feel the pull of her wind-filled sails, 

And hear the sea-gulls cry. 

Listen to her murmur and groan, 

Listen to her sigh; 
But feel her pulsing, throbbing heart 

Which makes my heart beat high. 

Jane Lowe '51 



TREE SHADOWS 

All hushed the trees are waiting 

On tiptoe for the sight 
Of moonrise shedding splendor 

Across the dusk of night. 
And now the moon has risen, 

And there, without a sound 
The trees all write their welcome 

Far along the ground. 

Becky Small '51 







POPULAR SONGS 

I'm tired, I'm sick of these silly songs, 
Of zings and zooms and dings and dongs, 
O bibbidie-bobbidie-boo-boo-boo-, 
A bushel and a peck and I love you. 

Oh, why! Oh, why can't I turn the dial 
And sit and relax and listen a while 
To a simple tune with a different theme 
Without silly words or a mixed up scheme. 

Alvin Morey '51 




FIRESIDE WANDERING 

On a cold winter night, it always is fun 

To thumb through the seed book of Burpee 

and Son. 
The plant-killing frost as yet is not out 

When seed manufacturers heartily shout 
That now is the time to purchase your plants, 

To plan, to prepare — don't leave it to chance! 

The catalogue is printed in colors so gay 

That spring and its promise seems well on 

the way 
Firm red tomatoes, lettuce all tender. 

Festival tulips and lilies so slender. 
Daffodils yellow and hyacinths blue 

Seem to bloom out of the book just for you. 

Fresh peas in the pod and succulent corn, 

Brilliant blue glories that bloom in the morn'. 

It's easy to dream, no backbreaking toil, 

An easy -chair farmer — no man of the soil; 

But someday, I vow, my good friends will gaze 
At flowers and vegetables I myself raised. 

Richard Martinelli '51 



RISE AND SHINE 

I find no fault with jokers, 
I ignore the playful pup, 
But I simply cannot tolerate 
The knave who wakes me up. 

These monsters' methods vary, 

With two they alternate — 

The first is known as "Rise and Shine!" 

The next, "Get up, you're late!" 

With sickening crash of windows 
And frightful slam of doors 
"Good morning to you, rise and shine!" 
The screaming villian roars. 

The shades fly up with gusto. 

The window glass vibrates. 

The knickknacks quake upon the shelf 

The room reverberates. 

I don't see why they do it; 
Do they think it just a joke? 
Do they like to make life miserable 
For us poor simple folk? 

Jane Hilton '51 












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Best Girl Citizen 

For the past fifteen years the National 
Society of Daughters of the American Rev- 
olution has asked high school seniors 
throughout the country to choose from their 
number the girl whom they consider their 
Best Girl Citizen. This year the Class of 
1951 has proudly given this honor to Jane 
Hilton. 

"Janie", editor-in-chief of the Pilgrim, 
is not only one of the most industrious in 
her class but is also one of the most gifted, 
with her ability in art, music, and in making 
friends. For three years she has been an 
active member of the Pilgrim staff, the 
octette, and girls' glee club. She has had a 
lead in the two school operettas and in this 
year's variety show. Jane has been on the 

S. A. S. for two years, was chosen as the alternate senator for Southeast- 
ern Massachusetts in her junior year, and was girls' basketball manager 
in her senior year. 

The work that Jane has done for us makes us proud to present her as 
our Best Girl Citizen. 





SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Seated: Secretary, Kathryn Gordon; President, Richard Tavares; Vice-President, Louis 

Mengoli. 
Standing: Treasurer. David Priestley; Advisor, Mrs. Raymond. 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Seated: Secretary, Jean Douglas; President, Brooks Johnson; Vice-President, Lawrence 

Benassi. 
Standing: Advisor, Mrs. Lydia Gardner; Treasurer, Marilyn Griffith. 



HI Mi i ttlli 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

Seated: Vice-President, Elinor Williams: President, Peter Damon; Treasurer, Richard 

Sturtevant. 
Standing: Secretary, Joyce Busi; Advisor, Carlo Guidaboni. 



School News 



September — 

Another school year began 
on September 6, with a group 
of 168 sophomores cordially re- 
ceived by all. 

This year the school voted 
to support the Jimmy Fund as 
a school project. Quotas were 
assigned to the various home- 
rooms according to their enroll- 
ments. 



A crafts class, composed of 
6 members under the super- 
vision of Mrs. Brown, has been started. These members have decorated 
trays and painted scenes on canvas. 




October — 

The school recognized United Nations Day on October 24 with an 
assembly held outside. The Reverend Ernest Pugh was the principal 
speaker. 

On October 26, the student body highly enjoyed Colonel Atkins, of 
the Salvation Army, who gave an interesting and amusing talk on the 
country of Alaska and of the people who live there. 

November — 

On November 17, the Seniors sponsored the first dance of the year — 
a Sadie Hawkins' Dance. A group of the Senior boys showed real talent 
in their number, "Doin' What Comes Natcherly", while the girls gave 
their version of "She'll Be Comin' Round the Mountain". Jane Hilton and 
Becky Small revived the dance of the 20's that night — the Charleston! 



December — 

Because of the hard work of Miss Jacques and her French III class, 
the school enjoyed an excellent Christmas assembly. Scenes were por- 
trayed while the Glee Club sang. The Octette also participated by singing 
Christmas carols. 



In order that their treasury might grow still more, the Seniors held 
a Holly Day Hop in the auditorium on December 21. As before, the enter- 
tainment was of the best! "A Mistletoe Kiss" and "White Christmas" were 
sung by the girls, while the highlight of the evening was a barber-shop 
quartet singing "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer." 

January — 

On January 4, we enjoyed a movie on Motor Vehicle Safety, sponsored 
by the Registrar of Motor Vehicles. "Last Date" vividly portrayed youth 
at the wheel. 

This year the Good Government Day assembly was combined with 
the presentation of athletic awards. Following the presentation of these 
awards for football, cross country, band, orchestra, girls' hockey, and 
cheer leading, Mr. Mongan spoke to us about good government. 

March — 

On Friday, March 2, the senior class again held a dance in the audi- 
torium. This dance was a "Record Hop" featuring Bob Clayton, who spun 
the records. The dance was a great success and everyone enjoyed himself 
immensely. 




RECORD HOP 




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NORTH ATLANTIC 



99 




The Juniors Speak 




PERFECTION PLUS 

Does your rare personality gleam? 

Does your character meet your esteem? 

Does that charm of yours glow? 

Do your good manners show? 

Are you radiant, placid, serene? 

How's your posture? Proud and erect? 
When you walk, do your toes point correct? 

Is your stomach pulled in? 

Do you keep up your chin? 
Is there nothing that you can perfect? 

And your clothes — are they spotless and neat? 
Are your shoes comfort's treat for your feet? 

Is your hem-line in style? 

Does your hair rate a smile? 
Do they say, "My dear, isn't she sweet?" 

Why lady, if all this is true, 

And you're just what I've sketched, through 

and through, 

You're the toast of the town, 

Here's a stone in your crown! 
But, there's something the matter with you. 

By Ann Hilton '52 



NEON 

Its cold red dye runs with the rain, 
And splashes in the street, 
And leaves a stain upon the pane, 
And drips from passer's feet. 

Dianne Dyer '52 



MEMORIES 

If I could only always keep 
The streaming, silver-plated rain 
And run it through my fingers 
To feel its touch again. 

If I could only always smell 
The heady pine of trees bent low — 
Their prickly outstretched branches 
Embracing fallen snow. 

If I could only always see 
The gleam of snowflakes in mid-air 
And feel them dropping on my cheek 
And feel them melting there. 

If I could only always know 
Its charm, and ever sense 
The beauty of God's nature, 
Its real magnificience. 

Marilyn Griffith '52 



"THE BATTLE" 

The wind, a strong ferocious man, 

Fights hard to reach his mighty clan; 

Our homes he uses for his forts, 
Our seas he uses for his ports. 

His foes, our trees, stand up to him 

With strong resistance, brave and grim; 

The bolder wind regains more powers, 

But larger trees stand straight as towers. 

The fight is long, with many hurt. 

The trees lie on the bloody dirt, 
The Eattleman counts out the dead, 

And then decides to move ahead. 

At last the wind becomes a breeze, 

And snowflakes fall to freeze the trees. 

And then the sun comes forth to melt 
All grief and pain the trees had felt. 

By Elaine Correa '52 




The Sophomores Speak 




THE PASSING STORM 

I awoke as dawn was breaking 
And saw the falling leaves; 
I heard the wind a rumpus making 
Against the bowing trees. 

A storm was sure to break, I thought, 
As clouds of gray passed by, 
And birds began to take 
A shelter from the sky. 

But then a dancing sunbeam 
Peered through the clouds at me; 
The storm, as if a dream, 
Had vanished out to sea. 

The wind had ceased its blowing; 
The birds began to fly 
The sun's rays now wore sparkling 
Throughout the lucid sky. 

Eleanor Travers '53 



"TELEEVISHUN" 

"Well, look at this new-fangled thing; 
You turn a knob to make it sing, 
A cowboy on an Injun hunt 
Looks out the window in the front. 
I've got no use for teleevishun!" 
Then Gramp stamps out in high derision. 
But, tell me folks, where's Grandpa gone? 
He's in there watching "Hopalong"! 

Priscilla Tillson '53 

PERENNIAL PARADE 

Out of the factory they come 

At the close of a day 

Of toil — 

The old, the young, the hopeful, 

With plans for the future — 

Marriage, a home — and the rest. 

All have thoughts and dreams 

That mingle with the smoke 

Of the stacks of the factory 

With its relentlessly roaring machines 

That echo the dreariness, the 

Weariness of the 

Men. 

Adele Vandini '53 



"The Saga of the Blue and Gray" 

In our country's story there appears a blemished page, 

One our great forefathers would never dare presage; 
The customs in the South, little like the North, 

Kept the two divided as wheat behind the swarth. 
Bondage was most hated by these folks in the North, 

So arguments on Slavery kept flying back and forth. 

So thus came the dreaded war which this act often 

paves. 
Now Abe Lincoln bore upon his chest 

The threat of war, which we detest. 
"Uncle Tom's Cabin", a book by Mrs. Stowe, 

Was the spark they needed to make abolishonists glow. 
The Union forces' leader was old Ulysses Grant. 

The South had Robert Lee, always so gallant. 
The army in the blue, the forces clothed in gray. 

Mighty were their spirits; little were they gay. 
Some had to win, and others, doomed to fall 

In line-of-duty, heard their Maker's call. 
To me war seems so foolish and always seems so wrong 

But through this civil war, our nation waxed strong. 

Allison Roulston '53 





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ACTIVITIES 




Cheerleaders 



Whether it be on the gridiron or on the basketball court, Plymouth 
citizens will always find the P. H, S. cheerleaders ready and willing to 
urge and cheer the boys on to victory. 

Some student bodies, in order to show they are helping to support 
their athletic teams, wear sweaters, pins, letters, and other articles in their 
school colors. This year the cheerleaders decided to sell little white hats 
sporting a blue P. The students supported this plan wholeheartedly and 
in the final sale over one hundred hats were sold. 

Competition threatened the girls this year, in the form of the "Cherry 
Sisters" who took over the duties of the cheerleaders at the pep meeting 
prior to the Braintree football game. They proved that talent such as 
theirs should not be wasted on the gridiron. 

Before closing this report the cheerleaders extend to you- — the student 
body, the teams, the teachers, and the general public — their genuine 
thanks for the support which was given to them this year. It is only then 
when they have received this support that they can feel that they have 
really accomplished their aim — wholehearted and enthusiastic support of 
the athletic teams. Cheering alone cannot win or lose a game, but it can 
certainly help to win! 






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FOOTBALL SQUAD 

Front Row: Ronald Cavicchi, Walter Correa, John Gomez, Charles Sanderson, Lewis 
Martinelli, Richard Tavares, Chester Bagni, Robert Pimental, Charles Abbott, Bert 
Rogers, Joseph Freitas, Curtis Tibbitts, Steve Tavares. Stanley Burgess, Howard 
Wood, Edgar Williamson. 

Back Row: Coach Walker, Charles Govoni, Daniel Beaton, Wayne Caton, Leonard Vaz, 
George Clarke, William Zuccelli, Brooks Johnson, Harold Motta, Harry Churchill, 
Leonard Sullivan, Robert Morini, Kenneth Reed, Richard Butters, Richard Gonsal- 
ves, Coach Romano. 

Football, 1950 

Coyle at Plymouth — September 23 

Plymouth High supporters got an early thrill when Joe Freitas took 
the opening kickoff on his own 20 yard line and raced 80 yards for a 
touchdown. The point was missed and Coyle started her downfield drive 
to tie the score with an end skirt by Bob Grecia, In the second period, 
neither team threatened; but in the third period kickoff, Coyle gained 
possession after the ball rebounded from one of the Plymouth linemen. 
Coyle then broke the tie when Don Williams went 40 yards for Taunton's 
second score. Willams also made another 30 yards for a touchdown run 
in the same period. In the fourth quarter, Coyle's fullback Dick McNally 
plunged over center for another score, and Murphy made the following 
point. The game ended with a score of 25 — 6 in favor of Coyle. 

Plymouth at Bridgewater — September 30 

The game got under way with an immediate threat by Bridgewater, 
but Plymouth's defense bogged it down; the Blue and White took pos- 
session and romped to the Bridgewater 45 before losing the ball on downs, 
Bridgewater was forced to punt, however, and the locals ended the quarter 
in possession of the ball. In the second period, Bill Hall of Bridgewater 
snagged one of Plymouth's passes and went 50 yards for a score. A return 
47 yards run by Butters made the score 6 — 6 at the half. The third quarter 
began with the ball in Plymouth's possesion. Plymouth punted on the 
third down, and Bridgewater, after an unsuccessful attempt to break 
away, was forced to kick, Johnson ran it back, and Joe Freitas scored on 
his 3rd attempt, the extra point also being made. Plymouth's other tally 
was made by Lenny Vaz over right guard, and Churchill again found the 
uprights. Final score was Plymouth 20, Bridgewater 12. 

Plymouth at Middleboro — October 7 

In the first few plays, Middleboro got the jump, and an early score 
was rung up with halfback Bob Brown leading the attack. A Plymouth 
fumble set up the second touchdown in the third period when Bob Brown 
again scored on a center rush. Plymouth's only score came in the last 
period when, after 5 successful first downs, Pimental bucked the line from 
the Middleboro 2 yard line. The game ended with Middleboro's 15 points 
topping Plymouth's 6. 



Plymouth at Whitman — October 14 

Coach Walker's 11 threw an early scare into the Whitman team as it 
moved up to Whitman's 19 yard line. A fumble, however, cut touchdown 
possibilities short. The first period was scoreless, but the first Whitman 
tally was made in the second period when Dereisier flung a long pass into 
the waiting arms of Chermocha, who took it on the 8 yard line for a score. 
In the third period, the Whitman Red and Black moved steadily up field, 
and Aitken scored from Plymouth's 5 yard line. A final score by Whit- 
man was made on a brilliant 32 yard run by Clark, Whitman's fullback. 
Final score 19 — 0. 

Abington at Plymouth — October 21 

In the opening minutes, Plymouth had their backs to the wall as a 
result of an off-bounds punt by Ralph Thompson of Abington. Johnny 
Vaz, however, took a hand-off over right tackle and raced 99 yards for a 
TD. In the second period, Abington moved up to the Plymouth 4 yard 
line, where Gilbride plunged over 
the line for a score; both points had 
failed so the score was 6 — 6. In the 
same period, however, with the aid 
of a 15 yard penalty, Butters and 
Freitas combined to score, Freitas 
making the tally. Abington came 
back gamely as Devlin bucked the 
line from the 3 yard spot and scored. 
The decisive point was kicked by 
Mattson; and as neither team threat- 
ened in the second half, the score 
ended Abington 13, Plymouth 12. 

Plymouth at Stoughton — Nov. 4 

In the opening quarter, the first 
score was almost made by Stough- 
ton's Richie Klim, who fumbled, only 
to have the ball recovered by team- 
mate Lou Baeta, who took the ball 
over for a touchdown. In the very first play of the quarter; Klim again 
had his hands on the ball and made good a 45 yard downfield run for 
Stoughton's second tally. Klim again scored on a 55 yard run in the third 
period, and another 33 yard run in the fourth. This was to be their final 
score. The Walker clan took over on a punt. Two forward passes and 
several breaks through the line brought the ball to less than 15 yards from 
a score, when a 15 yard penalty for unnecessary roughness put the ball on 
Stoughton's 1 yard line, Pimental then carried the pigskin over for the 
touchdown, and Harry Churchill kicked the extra point. Final score, 
Stoughton 25, Plymouth 7. 

Braintree at Plymouth — November 11 

Braintree was quick to score in the first period with 2 touchdowns by 
Slausson, one by Picardi, and 2 by DeTulho. Two points by Braintree 
were successful, and since no threats by Plymouth developed in the second 
period, the half ended 32 — 0. In the 3rd quarter, Litchfield intercepted a 
pass and was over from the 20 yard line for Braintree's sixth touchdown. 
In the same period, Picardi plunged over from the 2 yard line for another 
tally. Plymouth, still undiscouraged, struck back as Bob Pimental found 
an opening in the right tackle spot and made a score, with Churchill kick- 
ing the extra point. Final score, 46 — 7. 

"To love the game 
beyond the prize" 

— Sir Henry Newbolt 





CROSS COUNTRY 

1st Row: Robert Holton, Lawrence Benassi, Edward Pickard. John Schied, John 

Hathaway. 
2nd Row: David Mello, Owen Tavares, Dennis Smith, Coach — Carlo Guidaboni. 



Baseball, 1950 



P. H. S. began its 1950 baseball season when it met Rockland at home. 
This first game was a thriller with Plymouth winning by a 2 to 1 score. 
Allen Minelli pitched brilliant ball for P. H. S. Plymouth lost the second 
game to Middleboro by a 7 to 5 score. But P. H. S. then went on to win 7 
straight games before it again lost to Middleboro. P. H. S. won the first 
two of it's last three games and lost the third to Whitman. This gave the 
P. H, S. team a record of 12 wins and 3 defeats. 

The 1950 Plymouth High team was the best of recent years. The team 
batting average was .219 and the best individual hitter was John Andrews 
who batted .391. The only home run of the season was hit by "Mr. Short- 
stop", Dick Tassinari. We must also give credit to Jack Patrico, considered 
the finest catcher in the league. Paul "Hustle" Zaniboni could always be 
counted upon to come through with a base hit or a bit of humor to help 
out the team. The scores were as follows: 



Plymouth 


2 


- Rockland 


1 


Plymouth 


5 


- Middleboro 


7 


Plymouth 


10 


- Wareham 


4 


Plymouth 


11 


- Abington 


8 


Plymouth 


13 


- Whitman 


10 


Plymouth 


14 


- Hingham 


4 


Plymouth 


8 


- Rockland 


2 


Plymouth 


5 


- Wareham 


4 


Plymouth 





- Middleboro 


7 


Plymouth 


18 


- Abington 


6 


Plymouth 


10 


- Hingham 


7 


Plymouth 





- Whitman 


8 










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BOYS' BASKETBALL TEAM 

1st Row: Carl Anderson, Robert Davidson, Joseph Maguire Wayne Caton, Harry 

Churchill, Michael Barrett. 
2nd Row: Joseph Freitas, John Pinto, Richard Butters, Raymond Bussolari, David Pyle, 

Ronald Juliani. 
3rd Row: Coach — JofTrey Nunez, Raynor Taylor, Henry Savi, George Clarke, Louis 

Mengoli, John Wood, Francis Vancini. 
4th Row: Brooks Johnson, Philip Carletti, Donald Reed, James Reed, Norman Barnes, 

David Priestley. 



Basketball, 1951 



Dec. 19, 1950 Plymouth at Boston — Sippican Indians (Marion) 

Coach Jeff Nunez and his basketball team opened the 1950-1951 season 
in grand fashion in their opening game at the Boston Garden, as they took 
the Sippican Indians of Marion 49-37. 

Jan. 2, 1951 Braintree at Plymouth 

Plymouth scored one of the biggest upsets in years over Braintree 
High. At the start of the game which looked like an easy Braintree vic- 
tory, Braintree had an 18-15 lead, but Butters and Bussolari teamed up to 
cut the lead and take the game 55-47. 

Jan. 5, 1951 Plymouth at Wareham 

Against the favored Plymouth quintet Wareham opened their surprise 
package as Fontes, Spillane, and the rest of the team scored into early 
heights against Plymouth. In the first period, the score favored Wareham 
by a large margin and they held this lead throughout the game, as P.H.S. 
bowed 41-47. 

Plymouth at Middleboro 
i 3-way top place in the league in a win 
up, 90 points to 86, with Ray Bussolari, 



Jan. 9, 1951 

Plymouth High took over 
over Middleboro as they rolled 
high-scorer with 28 points. 
Jan. 16, 1951 



Plymouth at Abington 

Plymouth High, within 2 points of a tie with one minute to play failed 
to execute the needed power as the team took the first defeat in the Old 
Colony League, 48-44. 

Jan. 19, 1951 Weymouth at Plymouth 

Weymouth was not of the confidence of Braintree in her tussle with 
Plymouth, and thus took over an early lead of 13-8. The scoring of Gan- 
non put Weymouth on top during the whole game as she took the victory 
69-36. 



Jan. 23, 1951 Whitman at Plymouth 

Plymouth took a 52-48 decision from Whitman after a terrific struggle 
as Plymouth took the game by a close margin after keeping pace with 
Whitman until the 4th period. 

Jan. 26, 1951 Plymouth at Hingham 

Plymouth took an early lead in the Hingham game, but Hingham ran 
close in the 2nd period. When Blanchon, Hingham's captain and play- 
maker, fouled out, he left a much weakened team to face an eventual 
victory by the Nunez quintet. Final score was 63-42. 

Jan. 30, 1951 Plymouth at Rockland 

At Rockland, the deciding game of the league since Rockland and 
Plymouth were tied for the first place, got off to a rousing start as Ply- 
mouth took an early lead and took first place after a well fought game 
with a score of 54-48. 




Feb. 2, 1951 Abington at Plymouth 

Jumping into a 23-16 lead at the end of the 1st period, Plymouth held 
fine command over Abington High with a score of 69-59. 
Feb. 6, 1951 Middleboro at Plymouth 

Plymouth had an 8-2 game record as the locals floored Middleboro 
66-56 at Memorial Hall. Plymouth opened fire at the beginning, scoring 
25 to Middleboro's 11, and kept a good 10 point margin between them- 
selves and Middleboro. Butters and Pinto were high scorers for Plymouth 
with 20 and 17 points respectively. 

Feb. 9, 1951 Rockland at Plymouth 

A foul shot by Dick Butters with the score tied 36-36 and 50 seconds 
left to play put Plymouth in front as the Nunez coached quintet edged 
Rockland 39-37, and took over first place in the Old Colony League. It 
was an uphill scrap all the way for Plymouth as Rockland led 17-5 in the 
1st period. 

Plymouth at Whitman 

In the last game of the season, Plymouth took an early lead, but Whit- 
man bounced right back in the hall. In the 3rd quarter, honors went to 
Louis Mengoli, as he sunk 9 straight points. Plymouth won 39-36. 

Tech Tourney 

With high hopes, Plymouth went to Boston Garden to face Matignon 
High in the Class B tourney. However, a favored Matignon started early 
in the game to rack off a score that P. H. S. could not match. Matignon 
took the game 46-73. 



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TEN-CENT-A-WEEK COLLECTORS 

First Row: Adele Vandini, Cleta LaRocque, Margaret Sylvia, Janice Roy, Patricia 

Parkhurst, Joan Fortini, Joan Dries, Lucille Zanello, Joan Cravalho. 
Second Row: Cynthia Smith, Rose Romano, Joyce Contente, Naomi Furtado, Mr. 

Romano, Bernadette Kuhn, Joyce Busi, Betty Pimental, Roberta Anderson. 
Third Row: John Schied, Robert Traverso, Orman Jenkins, Richard Carlin, Norman 

Mitchell, Alfred Tedeschi, David Pyle, Richard Villano. 
Fourth Row: David Keay, Wallace Ruas, Chester Bagni, Raymond Bussolari, Joseph 

Fonseca, Stanley Burgess, William Harney, Alan Roby. 



Ten -Cent -A-Week Plan 



1950 marks the twenty-second year of this successful plan for the 
maintenance of our athletic program. Even though the expenses of this 
athletic program have increased steadily since 1929, the rate of payment 
has remained the same, mainly because of the increase in membership. 

Participation in this plan enables all students to attend home football, 
basketball, and baseball games. Pupils are also given a copy of the 
Pilgrim. If these things were paid for individually, the cost would amount 
to approximately three times as much per pupil. 

This year the student body has greatly enjoyed the benefits of the 
Ten-Cent-A-Week Plan and feels certain that future students of the 
Plymouth High School will continue in their support of a program which 
makes each member a real contributor to the success of the school 
activities. 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 

First Row: Marguerite Holmes, Nancy Prindle, Betty Krueger, Nancy Willis, Ann 

Dempsey, Elaine Cavicchi, Elinor Williams. 
2nd Row: Beverly Tassinari, Patricia Smiley, Jackie Smith, Marian Cadman, Laura 

Hutchinson, Naomi Furtado, Arlene Motta, Jane Hilton. 
3rd Row: Lois Stringer, Subra Carpenter, Marilyn Clark, Elizabeth Priestley, Lillian 

Mansfield. 

Girls' Basketball 

At the opening of basketball season, sixty eager girls reported to prac- 
tice. Of course sixty girls were far too many, and this number was reduced 
to twenty-five — fifteen forewards and ten guards. 

On December 13, the team journeyed to Duxbury. The first team won 
42 — 25. Ann Dempsey was high scorer for the Plymouth team with four- 
teen points. The second team lost 49 — 32. 

On December 19, the girls played at home. It was an exciting game, 
and Plymouth succeeeded in winning 26 — 25. Elaine Cavicchi took top 
honors scoring nineteen points. The second team lost 35 — 29. Elinor 
Williams did a good job chalking up twenty-three of the twenty-nine 
points. 

Plymouth invaded the Middle- 
boro gym Jan. 9 but left a more sad- 
dened team than when they entered. 
Middleboro succeeded in winning 
36 — 33. The seconds were more fort- 
unate, winning 22 — 21. 

The Plymouth team took a trip 
to Wareham on Jan. 17, but lost 
32 — 20. The second team also lost 
47 — 36. Williams and Smiley were 
the high scorers, scoring 16 and 13 
points respectively. 

The girls broke even this season 
winning three and three. If they had 
a chance to play the season over 
again they decided they'd like to 
play several more times and let 
Wareham go on its merry little way! 





GIRLS' HOCKEY TEAM 

1st Row: Suzanne Sharkey, Sylvia Bailey, Becky Small, Elaine Cavicci, Jackie Smith. 
2nd Row: Nancy Prindle, Lois Stringer, Laurien Enos, Marguerite Holmes, Joyce Busi, 
Ann Dempsey, Janice Williams. 



Girls' Hockey 



Sometime or other we have all heard the old saying " a winning 
team builds champions and a losing team builds character." Well the 
Plymouth High Girls may not be well-known for their winning of many 
games, but they will long be remembered for their outstanding character! 

In the first official game of the season, Plymouth played Duxbury. 
Plymouth was defeated by a score of 6 — 3. The second team also lost, the 
final score being 2 — 0. 

Looking for a first win, the girls played their old friends across the 
line — Kingston. They lost this game with a score of 1 — 0. 

Next on the list of opponents was Marshfield, but Plymouth lost 3 — 0. 

Still looking for that first win, Plymouth played those favored black 
and orange girls from Middleboro. Plymouth was again overthrown, the 
score ending 5 — in Middleboro's favor. The second team however, man- 
aged to defeat Middleboro's seconds by a score of 5 — 1. 

In the fifth game the Plymouth girls entertained one of its old rivals, 
Hingham. But the Plymouth girls couldn't - seem to put across any goals 
and lost 4 — 0. 

As the team faced their last game of the season, they were in great 
shape. They weren't going to stand for anymore defeats. And do you know 
something, all this pent up energy paid off. They succeeded in tying Mid- 
dleboro 1 — 1. And even better still, the second team defeated the Middle- 
boro seconds 3 — 0. 

As far as chalking up victories may go, our girls may not have done 
so well. But they at least had what it takes to go out there time after 
time — win or lose. The record also proved to be a sure sign that the girls 
were out to win the game and not just for the prize or for the glory of it. 




HONOR GROUP 

1st Row: Mrs. Raymond, Janice Roy, Joan Neri, Kathryn Gordon, Rosanne Rossetti, 

Lorraine Lewis. 
2nd Row: Rebecca Small, Priscilla Johnson, Shirley Henry, Raynor Taylor, Louis 

Mengoli. 
3rd Row: Brian Finnegan, Alton Morisi, Richard Martinelli. 



SPONSORS 



Dr. Victor V. Ragonetti 

Dr. William O. Dyer 

Dr and Mrs. Charles Benea 

Dr. Frank L. Bailey 

Dr. Richard M. Shift 

Dr. Samuel Swartz 

Honorable Amedio V. Sgarzi 

Dr. and Mrs. Rudolph E. Swenson 

Mr. John T. Burns 

Dr. A. L. Douglas 



Dr. Thomas A. Loft 
Dr. Elmer A. Shaw 
Dr. E Harold Donovan 
Mr. Richard R. Winokur 
Mr. George A. White 
Mr. Sumner A. Chapman Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. George C. P. Olsson 
Old Colony Bar and Restaurant 
Jordan's Pharmacy, Kingston 
Main Street Garage, Carver 
Carver Superette 







PILGRIM STAFF 

First Row: Allen Strassel, Priscilla Johnson, Marilyn Griffith, Joan Neri, Dexter Olsson, 

Jane Hilton, David Pyle, Rosanne Rossetti, Jeanette Doten, Carol White, Warren 

Burgess. 
Second Row: Dimitra Colas, Joyce Contente, John Tillson, Sylvia Melahoures, Mr. 

Roland Holmes, Janice Williams, David Priestley, Marguerite Holmes, Yvonne 

Corvelo, Kathryn Gordon 
Third Row: Joan Borgatti, Nancy Prindle, Peter Damon, Brian Finnegan, Bradford 

Barnes, Alvin Wood, Anna Stefani, Ann Hilton. 
Fourth Row: Richard Martinelli, Donald Avery, Raynor Taylor. 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 

First Row: Patricia Smiley, Sylvia Melahoures, Arne Erickson, Marilyn Griffith, Roy 
Alsheimer, Laurien Enos, Richard Tavares, Marie Evans, Jane Hilton. 

Second Row: Natalie Santos, Beverly Tassinari, Peter Damon, Joyce Busi, Harry 
Churchill, Joan Lexner, Wayne Caton, Roberta Randall, Kathryn Gordon. 

Third Row: Raynor Taylor, Mario Crociati, Sheldon Kaplow, Ernest Souza, Stephen 
Tavares, Chester Bagni. 




BAND 

1st Row: Joan Carton, Robert Wager, Joseph Feirriea, David Mello, Mario Crociati, 

John Pacheco, William Zuchelli, Wallace Ruas, Raymond Longhi, Richard Carlin, 

Joyce Contente. 
2nd Row: Roberta Randall, Francis Vancini, Alfred Lopresti, Rollene Zaniboni, Patricia 

Smiley, Sabre Carpenter, Wayne Caton, Robert Borsari, Leonard Vaz, Marcia 

Scagliarini. 
3rd Row: Emil Grondin, Allison Roulston, Peter Damon, Orman Jenkins, Stanley 

Burgess, Donald Weaver, Richard Barafaldi. 
4th Row: Alfred Vierra, Louis Cecco, Joseph Mondeau, Peter O'Brien, Charles Sanderson, 

Raymond Taylor, Joseph Sands. 




ORCHESTRA 

1st Row: Marilyn Griffith, Sylvia Melahoures, Patricia Goodwin, John Pacheco, Sabre 

Carpenter, Rollene Zaniboni. 
2nd Row: Richard Carlin, Mario Crociati, Richard Barafaldi, Joseph Mondeau, Wayne 

Caton, Robert Wager, Alfred Vierra, Raymond Longhi. 
3rd Row: Louis Cecco, Robert Borsari, Raymond Bussolari, George Lewis, Leonard 

Vaz, Peter Damon. 
Missing: Suzanne Sharkey. 



Ch o ,M 




OCTETTE 

1st Row: Shirley Holmes, Laura Hutchinson, Jane Hilton, Sheila Clough, Joyce 
Contente. 

2nd Row: Roberta Randall, Neilia Halunen, Sylvia Melahoures, Accompanist: Jean 
Douglas. 



T ..t j 



> a 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 



1st Row: Doris Youngman, Jean Douglas, Joyce Contente, Yvonne Corvelo, Cynthia 

Smith, Isabelle Silva, Elaine Barboza, Cecelia Jacobs, Marlene Proctor, Marilia 

Corvelo, Nancy Owens, Laura Hutchinson, Constance Crowell. 
2nd Row: Nancy Bailey, Roberta Randell, Patricia Goodwin, Joyce Busi, Claire Baratta, 

Adele Vandini, Nancy Dunlap, Lillian Mansfield, Nancy Morse, Rollene Perry, Mary 

Santos, Shirley Ferriera. 
3rd Row: Patricia Baker, Marilyn Griffith, Priscilla Johnson, Sally Holmes, Jane 

Dempsey, Margaret Sylvia, Jackie Smith, Diantha Gould, Janice Davis, Sarah 

Mandell, Nancy St. George, Patricia Murphy. 
4th Row: Ann Hilton, Marian Cadman, Jane Hilton, Ann Dempsey, Susan Bailey, Sally 

Eldridge, Sheila Clough, Joan Poirier, Neilia Halunen, Lucille Zanello. 
5th Row: Janice Williams, Sabre Carpenter, Maryanne Dixon, Sylvia Melahoures, 

Patricia Parkhurst, Joan Fortini, Dorothy Chase, Marilyn Clark, Joan Cavicchi, 

Beverly Weston. 



Trigonometry 

! 







M 



A 



Miss Locklins tri^f class 



Chemistry 



T 




H 



Mr. Rckafds cWi&ts-tote or hot to be 



Auto Mechanics 




Grease motikies fcy M* GuidaWi 



E 



ph 



ysics 



C 



N 



E 




Pupils have to work hard 
to he physic i-sts like Mr. Packard 



s 



c 



I 



Rad 



10 




Mr. Packard's radio men of the futur< 



Biology 




Mr. Youngs fcioio^y class of J 9l 



LATIN 



Aliquis error 



Forsitan et haec 





h7c latet 



QUOTES 



Nos a! I quod nemtnque 




olim meminine invabit 
Varum et mutabile 



DUX 



»tr 9» 




Semper femina 

Quern das 




decade jgessimvs 

Pietate j^ravem 




ac meritus 



Audet virii 





Neque me" Arjolica 
finer* laborum? ■ — concurrere vir^o 




de £ente negabo 



REMEMBER THE ROMANS 

Students, wake up! Latin is not dead. One needs only open his eyes and ears to realize 
that the Roman influence surrounds us every hour. 

In our own town, Plymouth, the contributions of the Roman civilization are passed 
over little noticed by all. 

Chances are that one of us washes with Lux soap, or uses the deoderant, Veto, 
brushes his teeth with Amodent, while many fellows use Vitalis hair tonic. 

The tourist in Plymouth sees what the Pilgrims contributed three hundred years 
ago. Does he see what the Romans gave us over a thousand years ago? The columns 
and dates on public buildings go unnoticed. A glance at the town clock gives us the 
time. We were given the figures on the face of the clock long years ago. 

The grave yard has many head stones and monuments bearing Latin inscriptions 
and epitaphs. 

The schools benefited with Latin teachers, while most of the English vocabulary 
is composed of direct Latin words or derivations of them. This, alone, is enough for 
which to be thankful to the Romans. 

Science has adopted the Latin Language as its standard because of its universal 
usage. 

The art and literature handed down from this period is worthy of merit compared 
to that of this modern world. 

We are greatly indebted to these people for their contributions to our civilization. 
Could we ever forget them? 

Allison Roulston '53 




The time creeps on; It's almost 
gone — we're waiting for the bell. 




WHAT ROMAN GOD? 
My first letter is found in mate, 
My second in end or ate, 
My third is always in rose. 
My fourth in car or close 
My fifth is seen in burn, 
My sixth in learn or turn, 
My last can be spied in yearn, 
I carry my rod always in flight; 
I'm taking messages day and night. 
You use my name in Chemistry — 
Can't you guess I'm ? 




In Latin II, 11:10, we're reading 
Latin well. 



Marilyn Griffith '52 



Mercury 




But now we stop — what is this? 
Could it be a rest? 



No such luck; we get stuck 
with a vocabulary test. 



SONG REVIEW 
'Five Minutes More" — to do my Latin assignment. 
"Long Ago" — When I forgot to do my assignment 
"That's For Me"— Latin. 
"Dream" — of an A in Latin. 

"It's A Grand Night For Singing" — When I finish my 
assignment. 

"I Believe" — I should try very hard. 
"Seems Like Old Times" — Still translating. 
"There Must Be A Way" — to earn an A in Latin. 
"I Don't Know Why" — I'm Crazy for Latin. 
"I'll Never Smile Again" — 'Til this is translated. 
"If" — I get through this assignment. 
"Why" — do I attempt Latin? 
"Because" — I want to gain knowledge. 

Patricia Baker '53 



LATIN CHEER 
Hie, heac, hoc, 
Dribble down the floor. 
Hunc, hanc, hoc, 
Come on boys let's score. 
Illo, ilia, illo, 
Come on boys let's go. 
Ipso, ipsa, ipso, 
You can win we know. 
Duo, Duae, duo. 
Let's go blue and white. 
Eo, ea, eo, 
Please win the game tonight 



Joyce Contente '53 



French 



Have you ever wondered about what takes place behind the closed 
doors of Room 30? If one entered this room Period Six, he would find us 
not only engaged in French grammar, vocabulary, and translation, but 
also discussing French food, songs, and Paris landmarks. Five of the 
members of French III will tell you of other activities. 

Priscilla Johnson 

Early in the year the French III class took up the study of French 
poetry. First there were the fables, then poems about children, nature, 
some word portraits, and finally some Christmas poetry. We finished up 
our work in the book by memorizing any ten lines of poetry. Also this 
year we have been learning the French words to popular songs, "La Vie 
en Rose", "Bolero", and others. 

Becky Small 

Early in December our class had an unusual treat. In hopes of im- 
proving our French enunciation we borrowed the wire recorder from the 
English Department. Each one of us read a passage from our text book 
in French, Our pronunciations and accents proved amusing when played 
back to us. We arranged to make another recording and compare the two. 

David Pyle 

The 1950 Christmas Assembly, under the supervision of Miss Jeanette 
Jacques, consisted of a Christmas Card Tableau presented by the members 
of the French III class. These were accompanied by a skit prepared by the 
four boys in the class. Music was furnished by the girls' glee club and by 
Sylvia Melahoures and Miss Nellie Locklin at the pianos. 

Richard Martinelli 

Since French III students are required to report on three French 
books, read outside of class, we began the task with Les Miserables, the 
story of Jean Valjean, by Victor Hugo. The remaining books were chosen 
by the class members independent of requirement. These include works 
by Hugo, Rene, Bazin, Dumas, and present-day French authors of note. 

Raynor Taylor 

During the year, under Miss Jacques' constant supervision, the pupils 
of French III have kept a day-by-day vigil for any news items concerning 
France. When discovered, 
they were clipped and 
brought to class the fol- 
lowing day to be discussed. 
These articles ranged from 
advertisements of airlines 
and shiplines to political 
movements. 

Donald Avery 




r% t% 




JIMMY FUND 

First Row: Beverly Tassinari, Betty Northrup, Richard Tavares, Roberta Randall, 
Laurien Enos, Marilyn Griffith, Roy Alsheimer, Joan Neri, Joyce Gallerani. 

Second Row: Robert Alberghini, Joan Lexner, Patricia Smiley, Wayne Owens, Paul 
Harmon, Harry Churchill, Sylvia Melahoures, Marie Evans, Raynor Taylor, Kathryn 



Gordon. 



The Jimmy Fund 



In 1947 the school instituted the practice of contributing money to worthwhile 
causes. In 1947 — 1948 we supported CARE; in 1948 — 1949, the Amputees Fund; and in 
1949 — 1950 the Children's Medical Center. As a continuance of these charitable projects, 
the students of Plymouth High voted to support the Jimmy Fund during 1950 and 1951. 
Each home room was given a quota, proportionate to the number of pupils every term 
so that by the end of the year Plymouth High School would be able to send a check 
for $890.00 to the Jimmy Fund headquarters. 

There was a close race among the Junior home rooms 202, 203, and 303, who met 
their yearly quotas before Christmas. 

The school interest was stimulated by Jimmy Fund baseball banks for the project 
and by the colorful graph designed by the S.A.S. President, showing the home room 
quotas and the quotas reached. 




OFFICE ASSISTANTS 

First Row: Rosanne Rossetti, Joan Neri, Mrs. Ruth Bailey, Pauline Story, Kathryn 

Gordon. 
Second Row: Doris Youngman, Shirley Cordeiro, Patricia Parkhurst, Marlene Proctor. 

Janet Costa. 
Third Row: Rollene Santos, Jane Thomas, Laurien Enos, Barbara Brenner. 




LIBRARY STAFF 

1st Row: Elinor Williams, Corinne Pierce, Joan Borgatti, Philip Tinti, Elaine Battles, 

Rosanne Rossetti. 
2nd Row: Ann Montanari, Shirley Cordeiro, Ann Capozucca, Mr. Arthur Pyle, Patricia 

Darsch, Constance Crowell, Patricia Murphy. 
3rd Row: Jane Lowe, Janet Eddy, Joseph Fonseca, Beverly Weston, Shirley Henry. 




DRAMATIC CLUB 

First Row: Patricia Murphy, Sally Mandell, Kathryn Gordon, Nancy St. George, Patricia 

Goodwin, Joan Neri, Marion Muthig, Marilyn Griffith, Mrs. Alice Urann. 
Second Row: Arlene Motta, Marcia Scagliarini, Betty Pimental, Priscilla Johnson, Joan 

Tibbitts, Shirley Garutti, Cynthia Smith, Nancy Dunlap, Rollene Zaniboni, Ann 

Capozucca. 
Third Row: Lucille Alsapeidi, Marie McMahon, Joan Pourier, Barbara Brenner, 

Patricia Darsch, Adele Vandini, Janice Davis. Joyce Contente, Patricia Parkhurst, 

Marie Evans, Joyce Busi. 
Fourth Row: Marion Cadman, Ann Hilton, Nancy Pellegrini, Janice Williams, Jane 

Hilton, Beverly Weston, Elizabeth Priestley, Sheila Clough, Roberta Anderson, Joan 

Cravalho, Joan Cavicchi. 
Fifth Row: Richard Kierstead, Ted Swenson, Donald Avery, Jack Schied, Robert 

Holton, Benjamin Cohen, Warren Burgess, Mansel Crowell, Philip Tinti. 



. ! 



ft(\<\ 




PRESS CLUB 

First Row: Shirley Henry, Richard Martinelli, Miss Wilber, David Priestley, Anne 

Montanari. 
Second Row: Joan Borgatti, Marion 'Cadman, Rollene Zaniboni, Nancy Pellegrini, 

Dorothy Chase, Joan Cavicchi, Sylvia Melahoures, Laura Hutchinson. Marilyn 

Griffith, Marion Muthig. 



3 f* 




BANK TELLERS 

1st Row: Lorraine Lewis, Constance Kingman, Roy Alsheimer, Nancy Willis, Richard 

Arponen, Nancy Pellegrini, Joan Cavacco. 
2nd Row: Shirley Cordeiro. Marion Muthig, Miss Kelly, Advisor; Marilia Corvelo, 

Joan Tibbitts. 
3rd Row: Priscilla Tillson, Alison Roulston, Flizabeth Priestley, Shirley Ferreira. 




RADIO CLUB 

Left to Right: John Chandler, Raynor Taylor, John Barrett, John Tillson, Mr. Packard, 
Advisor; David Priestley, Richard Martinelli, John Pinto, Bruce Henderson, Roy 
Alsheimer, Charles Abbott, John Davidson. 




PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 

Mr. C. H. 



Young, Advisor; Sylvia 



1st Row: Joan Borgatti, Richard Martinelli, 

Melahoures, Dorothy Chase. 
2nd Row: Patricia Murphy, Richard Carlin, Allison Roulston, Franklin Bassett. 
3rd Row: Bradford Barnes, Sally Mandell, Benjamin Cohen, Donald Avery, Robert 

Simmons. 




A 

y 

T 






A 

p 





PLVMOUTN SAVINGS B JI N X 




New Foyer as remodeled in 1950 




Old Foyer as originally built in 1887 



THE NEW and THE OLD 



■■ » ""■ ■ «-" - '— » • - 



mrrv 


IfTrnr 


Mfcta* 


hmmr 


Mil* 


nn*p 


nun* 


■nm»fr 


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Mtoav 

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n»wr 



jWtaap 
"»tnr 



MBIT 



tiyMO vik SjrYiTftfs Bjtyfx. 




Plymouth Savings Bank as remodeled in 1950 




Plymouth Savings Bank as originally built in 1887 



Plymouth Federal 
Savings and Loan Association 



Incorporated 1882 



James R. Chandler 
President 



Federalized 1937 

Robert J. Tubbs 
Vice-President — Treasurer 



Walder J. Engstrom 
Secretary and Assistant Treasurer 



QO/ OF YOUR \ - 



INSURED 






SAVINGS PLANS 
for FUTURE NEEDS 



i 



*&»«& 




'^WM* 



BUDGET PLAN 
Home Mortgage Loans 



CALL OR WRITE FOR INFORMATION 



44 Main Street 



Plymouth, Massachusetts 



Tel. 324 



Best wishes to the 
Qraduating Class of 

1951 



G V> 




6 - 8 Court St. 



SHDpurs. 

/oshion (enler 



-D- -D- -D- 
Shows the Newest in Misses', Women's and Children's Wear 



Compliments of 

MORSE & SHERMAN 

WM. J. SHARKEY 



Court Street 



Plymouth 



v^oodiag s 

Jewelers 

Established 1802 

DIAMONDS WATCHES JEWELRY 

Sterling Silver, Electrical Appliances 

Clocks, and Gifts 

EXPERT CLOCK and WATCH REPAIRING 

Telephone 429 18 Court Street 

PLYMOUTH 



Hamilton 
28 Main St. 




JEWELERS 

Keepsake Diamonds 
Elgin 



Longines 



Plymouth 



TOWN BROOK SERVICE STATION 

Mando's 

International Sales and Service 

. . . 24-Hour Road Service . . . 
14 Water Street Plymouth 820-W 



KAY'S CUT-RATE 

Lowest Prices 'in Town 

PATENT MEDICINES 
COSMETICS 

Corner North St. 67 Main St. 



COOPER DRUG CO. 

Incorporated 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 

DRUGS — CANDY — CIGARS 
TOBACCO 

HENDRIE'S ICE CREAM 

(In Seven Flavors) 
In Drags — If It's Bexall — It's Right 



'PLYMOUTH. MASS. EST. 1900 

'Fifty Years of Serving Plymouth' 

61 and 63 Main Street 



THE HOBSHOLE HOUSE 



An Inn With Early American Charm 



212 Sandwich St. 



Tel. 1153-W 



Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. O'Neill 



SHIRETOWN MOTORS INC. 



Sales 



&V? e d' 



Service 



Water Street 



Phone 1407 



Plymouth 



BEST WISHES 






To The Class of 1951 


to 


Very Best Wishes 




for A 




Successful Future 


To The Class of 1951 




EDES MANUFACTURING 




COMPANY 






OLD COLONY 




and PLYMOUTH 




THEATRES 


Plymouth, Mass. 




HENRY MENGOLI & SON 


Plumbing and Heating Contractors 


-•- 


AIR-CONDITIONING 


DELCO OIL BURNERS 



Compliments of 

The North Plymouth 

Merchants Displaying 

This Seal 




THIS MARK 



DESIGNED « PRINTED 




tSTASLliHCO tilt 



is your guarantee of . . . 
SATISFACTORY work by 

a 12 5 year old firm financ- 
ially strong with a record of 
Successful performance. 



THE ROGERS PRINT 

Complete Printing Service 

20 Middle St. Tel. 165-M 

Plymouth, Mass. 



Established 1919 




315 — 317 Court Street 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

PHONE PLYMOUTH 33 

Sales • Service • Maintenance 




PRINTERS and LITHOGRAPHERS 

LEYDEN PRESS 9 TOWN SQ - Plymouth, mass. 

"COMPLETE PRINTING — INCLUDING LAYOUT & FINISHED ART WORK 1 



Printers of this Publication 



TEL. 775 





Compliments of 




Pepsi - Cola 




Kist Beverages 




and 




O-So Grape 


Plymouth, Mass. 


Tel. 863 




Compliments of 




THE OCKERS COMPANY 


Books - 


— Greeting Cards — Gifts — Souvenirs 




Typewriters and Adding Machines 
Sales and Service 


15 Main Street 

Plymouth, Mass. 

Tel. 2255 


Office Supplies 

230 Main Street 

Brockton, Mass. 

Tel. 6028 




Congratulations 




to the Class of 1951 


M 


& M SPORTING GOODS CO. 


Tel. 1915 


25 Main St. 




Best Wishes 




To the Senior Class 




ft°**- D -'i3 


Tffietk - (Harrity 


HUGH L. GARRITY 


\june.iaL ^Service 



IF YOU WANT GOOD 
FRAPPES STOP AT . . . 

MAYER'S CANDY STORE 


Best Wishes 
to the Class of 1951 

WRIGHT BROS. FLORISTS 

Tel. 543 Kingston 


Best Wishes 
To the Senior Class 

COLONIAL 
DINER 


Congratulations 
to the Senior Class 

HOLMES and YOUNG 

CATERING SERVICE 
Carver, Mass. 


For A Quick Meal or Snack 
Stop at 

DAN'S DINER 

Main St. Ext. Tel. 1906 


House tf Blue Blinds 

GRACE & MARION GOODRICH 

In our homey dining-rooms and 

attractive screened terrace 

Unusual gifts in our "Petite Gift Shop" 

(Closed Monday) 
No. 7 on Historic North St. Plymouth 


GAMBINI'S 

AIR-CONDITIONED 

LUNCHEONETTE 

Tel. 372 52 Main St. 


''ICE cream 

Favorably Known for 66 Years and Still in a Class 

By Itself 

"Made For Particular People" 

131 Eliot Street Milton 87, Mass. 

BLuehills 8-7850 
10% Nelson Street Plymouth, Mass. 

Plymouth 160 



SAMOSET GARAGE INC. 




CHRYSLER — PLYMOUTH 


We Buy and Sell 


Sales and Service 


Good Used Cars 


Best Wishes to the Class of '51 




BAILEY MOTOR SALES, Inc. 




Telephone 1090 




BUICK and PONTIAC SALES and SERVICE 


-□- 




114 Sandwich Street 


Plymouth, Mass. 


Compliments 




of 




SCUDDER COAL & OIL CO 


• 



Best Wishes 

to 
Senior Class 



EGAN CHEVROLET COMPANY 



120 Sandwich St. 



PARTS • SALES 



SERVICE 



Plymouth 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
DUTTON MOTOR CAR CO. 

115 Sandwich Street 
PLYMOUTH 



OLDSMOBIJJT 



CADILLAC 



LINCOLN ST. SERVICE STATION 

CHARLES CARAFOLI 

L2 ^ N Cor. LINCOLN & SANDWICH STS. 




Phone 2009 



Plymouth, Mass. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

DUNLAP'S SERVICE STATION 

H. H. Raymond, Proprietor 



Compliments of 

PRIMO'S SERVICE STATION 

Primo Zucchelli 
Plymouth, Mass. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

SEARS FUEL 
COMPANY 



PETROLEUM SALES AND SERVICE INC. 

Agents for 

THE ATLANTIC REFINING CO. 

Filtered Range and Fuel Oils White Flash Gasoline 

Atlantic High Film Strength Motor Oils 

Hedge Road Plymouth 

Telephone Plymouth 1499 



Best Wishes for Health, 
Success, and Happiness 

Walter U. Schroeder 
Real Estate & Insurance 


Cape Insurance Agency 

Amedeo V. Sgarzi Orfeo H. Sgarzi 
Enrico Ferrari 

INSURANCE 

for Everything Insurable 

4 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 

Tel. 66 


Compliments of 

Plymouth Rock Joint Board 

Textile Workers Union 
of America, C. I. O. 

Farl R. Harper — President 
Robert Tassinari — 1st Vice-Pres. 
Lawrence Mossey — 2nd Vice-Pres. 
Arrigo Ferioli — Rec. Sec. 
Theodore Filteau, Man. 


"To our battle-stations 
With head, hand and heart" 

from 
A FRIEND 


To the Future Leaders of Plymouth: 

Our Sincere Best Wishes 
ELMER E. AVERY INSURANCE AGENCY, Inc. 

FOUNDED 1890 

Herbert S. Avery 
David Burgess Avery 
Stanley D. Roberts 
Marion E. Avery 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

/FIVE CENTS 
SAVINGS BANK 

/MCOAPOAArfC /ass 

PLYMOUTH MASSACHUSETTS 



cJhe ^Plymouth I iattonat [Joank 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 




CHECKING ACCOUNTS 

Commercial Personal "Checkmaster" 

BUSINESS and PERSONAL LOANS 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 
American Express Travellers Checks 



Hardware 


Plumbing 


JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 


Plymouth, Massachusetts 


Tel 


. 283 


Heating 


Sporting Goods 


Your Search for Furniture 


Compliments of 


Is Not Complete 
Until You Have Shopped 


J. W. BRENNER & SON 




Wallpaper — Paints 


GOGGIN and SON 


Artists' Supplies 


11 Court Street 


8 Samoset St. Tel. Ply. 1132 


PARK AVE. SERVICE STATION 


Best Wishes 


Socony — Vacuum Products 


from 


Cor. Court and No. Park Ave. 


JABEZ COR. SERVICE STA. 


Phone 1550 


Warren Ave. Tel. 161 


Best Wishes 


Best Wishes 


to the 




Class of 1951 


from 


SNUG HARBOR MOTORS 
Tel. Dux. 51 Duxbury, Mass. 


BUMPUS MACHINE SHOP 


Telephone 825 


P. O. Box 356 


BLISS HAF 


[DWARE CO. 


• Locksmiths 


• Toridheet 


• Builders' Hardware 


• Oil Burners 


• Mechanics' Tools 


• Plumbing — Heating 


• Pittsburg Paints 


• Sheet Metal Work 


• Electrical Supplies 


• Furnaces — Boiler: 


• Housewares 


• Shell Fuel Oil 



Compliments 


of 


Marios 


Auto Body Shop 


Mario E. Traverso, Proprietor 


112—114 Sandwich Street 


Rear Bailey Motor Sales Inc. 


PLYMOUTH MOTORS 


Compliments of 


SALES and SERVICE 


Plymouth & Brockton 


Kaiser * Frazer * Henry J. 


St. Railway Co. 


Water Street 


109 Sandwich St. Plymouth 


Tel. 1800 


Tel. 378 


LEADING SHOE STYLES 




For Dress, Casual or Sportwear 

• 


Compliments of 


HOSIERY — HANDBAGS 




All at Popular Prices 


C. P. WASHBURN CO. 


( eM>i^&L i 


GRAIN, LUMBER & PLUMBING 


CATERING TO TEEN-AGERS 





Nook Farm 




MILK 



and 



CREAM 



HEALTH BUILDER 



LOCAL MILK 



Nook Road 



Plymouth 



Telephone PLYMOUTH 1261 



CLOUGH'S MARKET 
Tel. 459 84 Summer St. 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

CAPPANNARI BROS. 


Best of Luck 
to the Class of 1951 

HOLMES GROCERY 

87 Sandwich Street 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

LOUIS KNIFE 


PLYMOUTH ROCK GROCERY 

Phone 1198 117 Sandwich Street 

Free Delivery 


C. S. BRYANT 
MEATS and GROCERIES 

Plympton 
Mass. 


WOOD'S FISH MARKET, 

RALPH F. GOODWIN, PROP. 

FRESH, SALTED AND SMOKED FISH 

Crabmeat, Scallops, Lobsters, Oysters and Clams 
Telephone 261 Plymouth 


ELIZABETH M. FOSTER 

BEAUTY SHOP 

Room 10 Bnttner Bldf. 
PLYMOUTH 


Best Wishes to Class of 1950 
THOMAS R. HOGAN 




,^^__ 




PILGRIM DRUGL 1 






Compliments of 

TAVERNELLI'S BARBER SHOP 

Soares and Ottani, Proprietors 


Special Sale on Waltham 

17 Jewel Ladies' and Gents' Watches 

$29.75 up. Tax included. 

Also we carry fine Hamilton watches. 

We repair watches in 5 days. 

E. BOTIERI, Jeweler 
290 Court St. No. Plymouth, Mass. 


Compliments 
of 

BARBIERI'S MARKET 

Jabez Corner Tel. 258 

• 
Quality Meats & Groceries 


H. A. BRADFORD & SONS 

Distributor (or 

S. S. PIERCE 
Specialties 

1 Warren Ave. Plymouth 
Telephone 1298-W 



Congratulations 

to the 

SENIOR CLASS 



THE ARTHUR L. ELLIS CO. 

Plymouth, Mass. 

Curtain Manufacturers 



NEW YORK • BOSTON • CHICAGO 



PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 

"The Men's and Boys' Store of Plymouth" 



□ 

PURITAN TAILORING DEPT. 
TAILORS — CLEANERS — FURRIERS 



"That Distinctive Store of Plyraonin" 

GEORGE V. BUTTNER 
STORE 

Plymouth's Most Modern Store 

For Ladies, Misses and Children 

Tei. 290 19-21 Court St. 

PLYMOUTH 



PLYMOUTH ROCK 
CLEANERS 

"The Place with Parking Space" 

Water St. - Opp. State Pier 
Phone 1744 



JACK OTTINO 



ALFRED VOLTA 



Best Wishes 
from 

McLELLAN'S 

H — $ioo 

School Needs 



ARONS FURNITURE CO. 

R 18 Middle St. Tel. Ply. 25 
O Everything - For 

N The - Home 

S 




MANOMET LUMBER CO. 

PAINT 

Building Materials 

Insulation Materials 

Builders' and Masons' Supplies 



State Rd. 



Tel. Man. 3560 



ALAN HEY'S 

Plumbing & Heating 

Wishes to extend its 

congratulations to the 

graduating class 



CRANBERRIES 

Are A Pilgrim Tradition 
For Quality Cranberry Products Use 





The Growers' Brand 
Hanson, Massachusetts 







PLYMOUTH CORDAGE COMPANY 



PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 





WALK-OVER SHOE STORE 

D. W. Besse 

65 Main St. Plymouth, Mass. 


Best Wishes from 

WALTER CARMICHIAL 

Carver, Mass. 






Best Wishes 

DEXTER'S SHOE STORE 

Footwear for 

THE ENTIRE FAMILY 

Tel. 165-W 16 Court St. 


DELANO & KEITH 

CIVIL ENGINEERS and SURVEYORS 

3A Main Street 






TOWN SHOE SERVICE 

6314 Main St. 
Plymouth, Mass. 


THE YARN SHOP 

16 Main St. Ext. 
Plymouth, Mass. 






Compliments of 

WARD & BRADY 

SIGNS 


Compliments of 

BELL SHOPS 

12 Court St. 
Plymouth, Mass. 






COLLEY TRANSPORTATION 
COMPANY 

Water Street 


KINGSTON LUMBER CO. 

BUILDING SUPPLIES 

14 Main St. No. Ply., Mass. 
Tel. Ply. 1665 






Compliments 
PLYMOUTH ROCK ALLEYS 


Compliments of 

PLYMOUTH HOME 
& AUTO STORE 

35 Main St. Tel. 525 






Best Wishes 
POST'N RAIL COTTAGES 

Great Herring: Pond 


Congratulations to 
the Senior Class 

JAY'S ARMY & NAVY STORE 

42 Main St. Ext. 
Plymouth Tel. 337-W 






Compliments of 
PLYMOUTH BAKING CO. 

Bread, Rolls, Doughnuts, 

Cake, Pies, and Cookies, 

Birthday Cakes 


THEO. THOMAS 

No. Carver Tel. Carver 16-2 

Specializing in Sale of 
CRANBERRY BOGS 





OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS